Apple

Apple hires BMW veteran in latest sign of electric car push

This photo, taken in March 2019, shows Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, California.

felixmizioznikov | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

Apple has hired Ulrich Kranz, a former senior executive at BMW who focused on electric cars, Apple confirmed to CNBC’s Phil LeBeau on Thursday.

The hire is the latest sign that Apple is serious about building an electric car to compete with automakers such as Tesla.

Hyundai said earlier this year it was in talks with Apple to manufacture its car before walking its comments back and confirming it was no longer in discussions.

Apple has never confirmed it is building a car but has hired talent from the automotive industry and tested self-driving software in California. In 2018, Apple hired Doug Field from Tesla, who worked on Tesla’s Model 3. With its expertise in supply chains, battery technology and user experience, Apple would represent a major competitor

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Apple self-driving car program sheds top executives, report says

Apple Car mockup

Will there be a real car? Or just some software? Who knows.


CNET

Three of Apple’s self-driving car executives departed the company in the past few months, according to a report from Bloomberg. The move poses more questions than it provides answers as it remains rather mysterious what Apple has up its sleeve for the automotive industry.

Apple did not immediately return a request for comment on the news, but according to the report, the self-driving car team lost Dave Scott, Jaime Waydo and Benjamin Lyon. Lyon was part of the original car team years ago and the company tasked him with the project’s long-term development. He departed the company for Astra, a firm focused on space satellite launches. Scott’s exit removes him from leading the team’s robotics division, while Waydo will no longer oversee the autonomous car safety and regulations teams. Leading the entire project is Tesla

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Apple and the End of the Car as We Know It

Now that the car is evolving into essentially a smartphone on wheels, it’s no wonder Apple is kicking the tires.

First, there is the transition from internal combustion engines to electric motors, which have far fewer mechanical parts. Now, enabled by that change, a second shift is under way—one that’s a prerequisite for a self-driving future.

For a century, the automobile was a system of interoperating mechanics: engine, transmission, drive shaft, brakes, etc. As those mechanics evolved, electronic sensors and processors were brought in to assist them, but the concepts changed little. The result was cars with dozens or hundreds of specialized microchips that didn’t talk to each other. Now that auto makers are moving to electric motors, elaborate entertainment systems and adaptive cruise control, cars need central computers to control all these things—why not use them to control everything?

At the hardware level, this might just mean fewer chips

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Apple (AAPL) May Reveal Key Details of Its Secretive Apple Car Project at Today’s “Spring Loaded” Event, According to a Credible Source

Apple Car, the iPhone manufacturer’s secretive EV program, has become the subject of a veritable frenzy as the rumor mill suggests that Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) may reveal key aspects of its electric vehicle at the “Spring Loaded” event later today.

Bear in mind that a Korean report last week postulated that the Apple Car would be manufactured in collaboration with the joint venture between LG Electronics and Magna International (NYSE:MGA) – the LG Magna e-Powertrain. Should this collaboration materialize, it would allow Apple to better utilize its existing synergies with LG affiliates. Additionally, Apple would then be able to tap into Magna’s substantial manufacturing prowess. As a refresher, Magna already has production contracts with around 45 OEM customers, including Toyota, BMW, Honda, Hyundai, Volvo, Volkswagen (VW), and Fisker (NYSE:FSR). Recently, the company signed an agreement with the Israeli startup REE Automotive to build its

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