MercedesBenz

Mercedes-Benz Thought-Driven Car Is Inspired By James Cameron’s ‘Avatar’

German car manufacturer Mercedes-Benz seems to be going all out with its dream project – the AVTR concept car that is expected to be something right out from maverick filmmaker James Cameron’s popular science fiction movie Avatar. While the luxury automotive brand has been working on this project for the past few months, they just raised the bar to the next level by unveiling a new version of the concept car that would use the Brain-Computer Interface technology.

Known for their high-end luxury vehicles and setting new market trends with their innovative technology, Mercedes-Benz is leaving no stoned unturned with its futuristic AVTR concept car. In addition to the breathtaking design, the German carmaker is determined to introduce humans to the wild concept of thought-driven vehicles. And at the recent IAA 2021 show in Munich, Mercedes-Benz revealed its BCI technology car version that sent a wave of astonishment across the

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Mercedes-Benz reveals its first electric car: meet the Mercedes-Benz EQS

Mercedes-Benz is giving up the growl.

The German luxury automotive brand on Thursday debuted its first-ever electric sedan, the Mercedes-Benz EQS.

The company is describing the EQS as a sibling of the recently redesigned high-end S-class, which is typically considered the brand’s most luxurious ride. But the slightly shorter vehicle, which Mercedes has been teasing in advertisements, has its own electric architecture.

The EQS is expected to compete directly with electric cars like the Tesla Model S and Porsche Taycan. It will debut as a 2022 model and while a starting price hasn’t been announced, car-research site Edmunds recently estimated $110,000.

Missing the trademark engine roar associated with high-performance gas-powered models, the EQS will nonetheless deliver significant power, albeit with a quiet electric motor.

The first versions sold in the U.S. will be the EQS 450+ with 329 horsepower and the EQS 580 4MATIC with 516 horsepower, both

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Mercedes-Benz 300SL Is One Of The World’s Most Renowned Favorites

⚡️ Read the full article on Motorious

As a European sports car importer in the 1950s, Max Hoffmann used his influence to refine European sports cars into the legends they are known as today. One of his most notable accomplishments came in the form of the Mercedes-Benz 300SL “Gullwing,” the result of which evolved to create the Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster.

This masterpiece of automotive history all started with the 1952 Le Mans W194 competition coupe’s rigid and lightweight tubular space-frame chassis, modified of course to accept traditional style swing-open doors. Under the hood is a M198 3.0-liter straight-6 that utilizes a unique direct fuel-injection system to produce 225-horsepower to the car’s rear wheels.

For the sake of style, the engine was canted at a 45-degree angle which allowed it to fit under the car’s sleek hood. According to Road & Track, the 300SL was capable of a 7.4-second 0-60

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Hemmels Turns the Classic Mercedes-Benz 280SL ‘Pagoda’ Into an Electrified Restomod

Between Hemmels‘ vaguely Teutonic-sounding name and obsession with Mercedes-Benz classics, you’d be forgiven for assuming the automotive restoration outfit was based somewhere along the Rhine. Instead, a trip to the town of Cardiff in Wales is required to visit Hemmels’ pristine workshops, where typically on display are four specific Merc models in various states of undress.

Since 2016, Hemmels has had only one goal in mind, to do ground-up rebuilds of vintage Mercedes 300 SL Gullwings and Roadsters, 190SLs, and 280SLs—the latter best known as “Pagodas” for their squared-off roofs. The word “restoration” doesn’t do Hemmels’ work justice. The company, in fact, trademarked its process with the name Neugeboren, or “new born” in German, a nod to the fact that Hemmels believes customers should view the result of each 12-month project as a new car, one-year warranty included.

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