Ford GT in Bare Carbon at Petersen Museum

The Petersen Automotive Museum displays Ford’s limited production “Liquid Carbon” supercar. © Hot Rod Network

The Petersen Automotive Museum displays Ford’s limited production “Liquid Carbon” supercar.



a close up of a toy car: 001-ford-gt-bare-carbon-petersen-museum


© Hot Rod Network Staff
001-ford-gt-bare-carbon-petersen-museum

When you read the story about the Petersen Automotive Museum’s display of the 2021 Ford Bronco design prototype, you may have noticed that Ford’s resurrected SUV was sharing lobby floor space with a remarkably contrasting vehicle. The second-generation Ford GT is one of the wildest designs to wear the Blue Oval badge—and the special Liquid Carbon edition takes it one big step further.



a car parked on the side of a building


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The Ford GT—a 21st century version of the classic GT40 from the ’60s — was a concept car before it became a limited production vehicle (just over 4,000 cars) for the 2005 and 2006 model years. The second gen ford GT appeared in 2015, debuting at the North American Auto Show in Detroit. The broad hood might remind you of the shovelnose shape that was an iconic characteristic of the ’60s-era GT40s. Super-sized vents in the hood and rear fenders contribute to aerodynamics and cooling; air exits via the the hollow circular taillights. The rear spoiler is adjustable for maximum benefit under various conditions.



a close up of a car


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Modern Supercar

The 2020 Ford GT, revealed at the Chicago Auto Show, received a few upgrades, including cooling improvements and the use of titanium in the exhaust system to reduce weight. The 3.5-liter turbocharged EcoBoost V-6 engine was packed with 13 additional ponies, increasing horsepower from 647 to 660 hp. MotorTrend magazine, HOT ROD‘s sister publication, has more details.



a close up of a car


© Hot Rod Network Staff


The Ford GT parked in the lobby of the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles is a special edition of an already limited production car. The Liquid Carbon edition, handbuilt by specialty automotive component supplier Multimatic, features an unpainted, clear-coated bare carbon-fiber exterior.






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Bare Carbon Edition

“The Ford GT is a masterpiece of engineering, complimented with a unique and timeless design,” Ford GT program manager Michael Severson told us. “The appearance is further intensified when paint is not applied, unmasking a fully exposed carbon-fiber exterior. The Liquid Carbon Ford GT is an extremely low-production variant and features a fully exposed carbon-fiber exterior. The appearance standards are so stringent that only a small percentage of the exterior panels are approved for use. The panels are meticulously hand-fitted so the exposed weave flows seamlessly from one panel to the next. The lines of the Ford GT makes this process extremely difficult and time consuming. Each Liquid Carbon takes an additional six weeks to build when compared to other variants of the car.”



a car parked on the side of a road


© Hot Rod Network Staff


The automotive world is made up of many categories, and the category we often hear for the Ford GT is supercar. As it turns out, the recently reopened Petersen Automotive Museum, in addition to displaying the Liquid Carbon Ford GT in the lobby, is currently displaying more than 30 other cutting-edge historic cars in an exhibit entitled Supercars: A Century of Spectacle and Speed. Check back soon for our gallery of photos from that exhibit.

The Petersen Automotive Museum is now open Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with health and safety guidelines in place. Visit the Petersen Automotive Museum website for more information.

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