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Here’s why GM’s electric vehicle push is a big risk

General Motors‘ aspiration to stop selling fuel-burning cars by 2035 could put a big dent in its overall market share if it doesn’t considerably boost sales, some auto industry analysts think.

While electric cars are in vogue, and companies like Tesla command share prices that could make a legacy automaker envious, automotive insiders continue to voice concerns over how ready the world is to fully shift to electric vehicles. Firms that survey car buyers frequently say many still worry about vehicle range and charging times, for example.

GM, the largest U.S. automaker, said its plan to eliminate tailpipe emissions by 2035 is a goal and not a guarantee. Nevertheless, it is making a big push into pure electric vehicles, as more than 30 new models are expected by 2025.

GM’s plan does not include hybrids, which blend internal combustion engines with electric power, and which many see as

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Apple hires BMW veteran in latest sign of electric car push

This photo, taken in March 2019, shows Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, California.

felixmizioznikov | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

Apple has hired Ulrich Kranz, a former senior executive at BMW who focused on electric cars, Apple confirmed to CNBC’s Phil LeBeau on Thursday.

The hire is the latest sign that Apple is serious about building an electric car to compete with automakers such as Tesla.

Hyundai said earlier this year it was in talks with Apple to manufacture its car before walking its comments back and confirming it was no longer in discussions.

Apple has never confirmed it is building a car but has hired talent from the automotive industry and tested self-driving software in California. In 2018, Apple hired Doug Field from Tesla, who worked on Tesla’s Model 3. With its expertise in supply chains, battery technology and user experience, Apple would represent a major competitor

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CT car dealers push back on ‘Tesla bill’

Figures in the state’s car dealership industry are once again taking aim at a bill that would permit electric vehicle manufacturers to sell their cars directly to consumers, arguing the proposal will result in fewer protections for buyers and undercut local businesses.

The bill, known as SB 127, is the latest in a series of attempts to at least partially roll back some aspects of the state’s dealer franchise law, which requires car companies to sell through franchised dealers. Lawmakers put forward a direct sales proposal every year between 2015 and 2019, but each time it stalled in the General Assembly.

Within Connecticut’s car dealership sector, the reappearing legislation has come to be known as the “Tesla bill,” after California-based electric vehicle maker Tesla Inc. Tesla has backed similar legislation in states throughout the country in an effort to expand its direct sales model and, as the world’s largest electric

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