GMs

GM’s new software platform will enable over-the-air updates, in-car subscriptions, and maybe facial recognition

General Motors announced a new “end-to-end” software platform for its cars called “Ultifi” — a play on the name Ultium, which is the automaker’s new electric vehicle battery architecture. GM says the new software will enable over-the-air (OTA) updates, in-car subscription services, and “new opportunities to increase customer loyalty.”

The automaker envisions the new software powering everything from the mundane, like weather apps, to potentially controversial features like the use of in-car cameras for facial recognition or to detect children to automatically trigger the car’s child locks. The Linux-based system will also be available to third-party developers who may want to create apps and other features for GM customers.

GM is currently undergoing a “transformation… from an automaker to a platform innovator,” said Scott Miller, vice president of software-defined vehicles at the company. Miller said he envisions Ultifi serving the role as a “powerful hub for all

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Here’s why GM’s electric vehicle push is a big risk

General Motors‘ aspiration to stop selling fuel-burning cars by 2035 could put a big dent in its overall market share if it doesn’t considerably boost sales, some auto industry analysts think.

While electric cars are in vogue, and companies like Tesla command share prices that could make a legacy automaker envious, automotive insiders continue to voice concerns over how ready the world is to fully shift to electric vehicles. Firms that survey car buyers frequently say many still worry about vehicle range and charging times, for example.

GM, the largest U.S. automaker, said its plan to eliminate tailpipe emissions by 2035 is a goal and not a guarantee. Nevertheless, it is making a big push into pure electric vehicles, as more than 30 new models are expected by 2025.

GM’s plan does not include hybrids, which blend internal combustion engines with electric power, and which many see as

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