cold

Maxim Integrated’s Automotive Backlight Driver with Integrated Boost Converter Sustains Full, Constant Brightness of In-Car Displays Even During Cold Crank Conditions | State

SAN JOSE, Calif., July 6, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Maxim Integrated Products, Inc. (NASDAQ: MXIM) introduces the four-channel, low-voltage MAX25512 automotive LED backlight driver with integrated boost converter. It is the only integrated solution that retains full, constant brightness of in-car displays even during extreme cold crank conditions down to 3V input voltage. The single chip LED driver eliminates an external MOSFET and current sense resistor and integrates I2C communication to lower bill of material cost and reduce board space by 30 percent. The highly integrated LED driver includes four 120mA channels with the industry’s highest efficiency at 2.2MHz operation.

Today’s automotive start-stop systems increase fuel economy, but they can challenge the power delivery system to maintain the same level of display brightness during re-start. For example, features like display illumination upon entry can be affected by cold crank situations, with the engine drawing down the car

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Tesla caught in the crossfire of a brewing tech Cold War with China

Musk has rebuffed those fears, insisting that if the electric car company was used to spy by any nation it could be shut down. “There’s a very strong incentive for us to be very confidential with any information,” he told a prominent Chinese forum.

Dan Ives, an analyst at investment firm Wedbush, says: “With a brewing Cold Tech War between the US and China, Tesla remains caught in the crossfire.”

Experts and veterans of the Chinese auto industry say Musk will need to work hard to ensure his automotive behemoth does not become an inverse case of Huawei, the Chinese tech giant that has had its ambitions battered by similar security concerns from the US government.

“If I’m Tesla, I would find it disconcerting,” says Michael Dunne, head of the Chinese-focused automotive consultancy ZoZo Go, who lived and worked in China from 1990 to 2016. He describes the move

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In cold weather, how often should I start my car?

Corrections & Clarifications: An earlier version of this story misstated what happens when liquids are frozen. Water expands when frozen, while most other liquids do not.  

An intense cold snap is threatening to smash record lows across much of the nation through Thursday. 

With temperatures sliding and winter fast approaching, many car owners are asking: How often should I start my car to warm it up?

Turns out, the answer doesn’t lie in frequency.

Experts at AAA, a federation of motor clubs, say it’s not a good idea to warm your car up to keep it from freezing. 

“Ninety-five percent of the cars on the road today don’t use carburetors, so you no longer need to warm them up on cold days,” said Mike Calkins, manager of technical services at AAA.

Instead of repeatedly starting up your car to keep it warm, drivers who are concerned about their engines

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How often should I start my car and let it idle in cold weather? Answer: Don’t.

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Can These 3 Semiconductor Stocks Keep Up Their Strong Growth Momentum?

Silicon chips are absolutely essential to our modern digital world. You’ll find them in everything from your PC to your smartphone to your car to your coffee maker – even the pedestrian light at the crosswalk is controlled by semiconductor chips, giving the chip makers the benefit of a captive customer base. 5-star analyst C.J. Muse, of Evercore ISI, builds his view of the chip stocks’ prospects on that base, writing: “With every industry vertical increasingly focused on digitalization combined with product cycles including 5G, AI/ML, a broad-based recovery in Auto/Industrial as well as expected continued strength in PCs and a recovery in Networking … our base case calls for Semi revenues to grow 14% in CY21 to $500B.” This isn’t the only positive point, as Muse goes on to say, “Add in potential for stimulus combined with

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