Heres

Apple Car: Here’s what we know so far

Edgar Cervantes / Android Authority

Few things are confirmed about the legendary Apple Car beyond it being some sort of large-scale automotive project. As usual, the iPhone maker is being as secretive as possible — yet there have been far too many reported hires, deals, and other developments for its auto work to be purely experimental. Here’s what you need to know to get up to speed with the Apple Car.

Also read: Green Authority — The best electric motorcycles you can get

What is the Apple Car?

Apple Car Mockup interior

Edgar Cervantes / Android Authority

At its core, we know Apple Car involves some form of EV (electric vehicle). All the rumors have pointed in that direction, and gas wouldn’t make sense for a company that rides on green credentials. By the time any product hits the streets, gas will probably be seen as backwards — especially in Apple’s home

Read More

Here’s a buying opportunity for smart used-car shoppers

Americans bought more than 225,000 Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) cars in September. That’s a 2% increase from August and a 1% increase compared to September of last year.

Selling too fast for certification

But the slight increase masks a startling phenomenon. CPO sales could have been much higher, except that dealers may be selling used cars too fast to pass them through the certification process. That creates a unique buying opportunity for smart shoppers (more on that in a moment).

Kevin Chartier, vice president at Manheim Consulting, explains, “In today’s market, everything is selling so quickly and at such high prices, that I think that in many cases the dealers are selling cars before they get a chance to pull them into their shops to spend the time to recondition them up to full CPO standards.”

(Manheim Consulting and Kelley Blue Book share the same parent company, Cox Automotive.)

Also see:

Read More

New-car destination charges are absurd: Here’s why

You’d think the price you see is the price you pay on a new car’s window sticker, but that is not the case. Taxes aside, there’s another charge you have to keep in mind: the destination charge. There’s no use haggling or looking for a discount on this fee. You, as the car buyer, have to pay it — and it’s typically an extra $1,000. Why? We’ll dive into that.

Consumer Reports examined the rise of destination fees and found they’ve climbed from an average of $839 in 2011 to $1,244 in 2020, a massive 48% increase in less than a decade. Over the same period, the price of an average new car has risen “just” 27%. I join CR in calling for destination fees to be made part of MSRP and not a footnote to it.

Ford F-150 destination fee

The destination fee is chunky, but it doesn’t even get put in

Read More

‘Car Talk’ Ends Its Radio Run. Here’s What Ray Magliozzi Hopes You’ll Remember

All road trips eventually come to an end. On Saturday, The Best of Car Talk will air on WBUR for the final time.

Car Talk launched as a local show on WBUR in 1977, with brothers Tom and Ray Magliozzi of Cambridge behind the microphones. A decade later, the show went national and became an enormous and enduring hit for NPR.

Tom Magliozzi, behind, and Ray Magliozzi celebrate 20 years on the radio at the WBUR studios on June 13, 2007. (Ted Fitzgerald/WBUR)
Tom Magliozzi, behind, and Ray Magliozzi celebrate 20 years on the radio at the WBUR studios on June 13, 2007. (Ted Fitzgerald/WBUR)

Through it all, the Magliozzis offered callers and listeners their advice as auto mechanics and — more remarkably — provided an endless supply of warm-hearted wit, curiosity, goofiness and laughter.

Now, almost seven years after the death of Tom Magliozzi at the age of 77, his little brother Ray joined WBUR’s Weekend Edition to reflect on the Car Talk era.

Below are highlights from the conversation,

Read More